NV GOP Demands Redistricting Quotos


On Friday, NV Senate Republicans released a statement in which they said they “insist” on pre-conditions for negotiation.  In it, they list their demands, which look more like quotas and problems in compliance with the Voting Rights regulation as it relates to packing the vote:

“Republican Legislators insist on the following benchmarks as a condition for redistricting negotiations:

  • 1 majority-Hispanic congressional district;
  • 4 majority-Hispanic senate districts;
  • 8 majority-Hispanic assembly districts; and
  • Enough competitive state senate and assembly districts to ensure that no party will have a monopoly on power”

Keep in mind, these demands are from a party in the minority in all but the rural expanse of the state.  According to the data posted on the Nevada Secretary of State site, Nevada has 406,986 Republicans, 466,512 Democrats and 233,252 minor party and unaffiliated registered voters.  Apparently the GOP Senators believe those 233, 252 voters belong to them and thus give them superior bargaining strength.  Well, I have news for them.  After what GOP Governors across this nation, and after what the GOP-controlled US House have been doing to union rights and women’s rights, they will hopefully have another serious think coming.

September 2010 Active Voters by COUNTY and PARTY (from Secretary of State site)

County Name Democrat Green Indep. American Libertarian Non-Partisan Other Republican Total
Carson City

8,654

56

1,148

137

3,315

110

11,107

24,527 

Churchill

3,185

11

612

57

1,534

36

6,830

12,265 

Clark

332,232

1,779

30,318

4,034

115,996

2,070

241,778

728,207 

Douglas

8,004

84

1,225

198

3,842

97

14,898

28,348 

Elko

 4,365

18

699

115

2,719

40

10,005

17,961 

Esmeralda

146

1

48

7

64

3

319

588 

Eureka

191

1

73

4

128

6

672

1,075 

Humboldt

1,583

6

255

43

921

19

3,369

6,196 

Lander

612

1

82

12

395

6

1,527

2,635 

Lincoln

887

5

99

10

274

3

1,425

2,703 

Lyon

8,223

65

1,775

195

4,050

107

13,038

27,453 

Mineral

1,355

2

158

17

352

13

1,139

3,036 

Nye

8,587

32

1,447

178

3,652

50

10,596

24,542 

Pershing

704

0

74

8

354

4

1,060

2,204 

Storey

802

11

149

21

398

5

1,204

2,590 

Washoe

85,339

890

9,612

1,581

33,224

1,245

86,050

217,941 

White Pine

1,643

9

202

22

624

10

1,969

4,479 

Statewide    

466,512

2,971

47,976

6,639

171,842

3,824

406,986

1,106,750 


Republicans may hold the Governor’s position, but Democrats currently hold both the Assembly and Senate.  That’s because the biggest voter numbers are in the urban areas (Vegas, Henderson, Reno, Carson City) and the majorities of those voters are Democrats and/or Democratic-leaning.  The GOP may be in the majority in all the rural counties, but the total number of those voters don’t come close to matching or overcoming the number of voters in the major metropolitan areas.

No matter, the GOP wants to gerrymander a solution that gives them an opportunity to take control of both houses in the legislature and the governorship.  Their answer, PACK the Hispanic voters into one of the new Congressional Districts so as to dillute their (Democratic) influence in the remaining three districts.  They also want to pack them in particular NV Senate and Assembly districts to dilute their (Democratic) influence in the remaining Senate and Assembly districts.  “We believe the (federal) Voting Rights Act requires fair representation for Hispanics,” Sen. Barbara Cegavske, R-Las Vegas, said. “We also believe no political party should have a monopoly on power.”  Thus, they believe if they pack the Latino vote, thus giving them an in-road to power and glory.

Packing— Concentrating like-minded voters together in one district to reduce their voting power in other districts. This gives the group representation in a single district while denying them representation across districts.  Packing is a redistricting device to concentrate, in a single or small number of districts, more Hispanic voters than are necessary to have electable Latino districts, in order to prevent the communities of color from winning enough seats to gain a majority of votes on a municipal or county board, or to win enough seats at the state level, to impact the formation and implementation of public policy.


Republicans, on the other hand, are accusing Democrats of cracking the Hispanic vote.

Cracking — Spreading like-minded voters apart across multiple districts to dilute their voting power in each. This denies the group representation in multiple districts.

Negotiation on redistricting has been held up because the GOP hadn’t made their redistricting data public, a condition the Democratic caucus insisted upon.  Republicans finally released their set of complicated data about their redistricting proposal that most of the public in general, will have a hard time wading through.  With that release, Democrats have now put their second attempt at redistricting on temporary hold in the Senate so they can determine if common ground might exist.

In the meantime, Latino leaders have come up with their own plan.  “We need to have influence with more than just one representative,” said Vincenta Montoya, chairwoman of the Sí Se Puede Latino Democratic Caucus and a coalition member.  Their plan resembles the Democratic plan, but with a few tweeks.

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