Obamacare Reality Check


— submitted by Rich Dunn, RNDC 2nd Vice Chair

If you’re asked about Obamacare, use it as an opportunity to show how much difference progressive change can make. Open enrollment began one year ago, on October 1st, 2013. The websites had a rocky rollout, but 10.3 million Americans who had no health insurance a year ago now have coverage. Competition has increased – there are now 25% more insurance companies offering policies in the health insurance market. United Healthcare, the market leader, will be offering policies on 25 state exchanges in 2015, double the number in 2014. The system was designed to foster competition, and that is exactly what is starting to happen.

According to the Republicans, the ACA was going to be a government takeover of heathcare. But you wouldn’t know that from how private sector insurers have been doing on the stock market. United Healthcare’s stock is up 16%, Humana’s is up 34%, Aetna’s 22%, Cigna’s 13% and Wellpoint’s a whopping 37%. Some government takeover that turned out to be.

On top of that, 8.2 million seniors have saved over $11.5 billion, money that went right back into the economy. Republicans predicted that Obamacare would send costs through the roof, but between 2010 and 2013 health care costs have only risen at an annual rate of 1.1%, which is the slowest rate of increase of any three year period on record and below the overall rate of inflation.

Hospitals are expected to save $5.7 billion dollars this year alone in uncompensated health care costs. Republicans kept saying that all people without insurance had to do was go to the emergency room, but as usual they never mentioned who was supposed to pick up the tab – the hospital, of course. Thanks to Obamacare, that’s now far less of a problem. Most of that $5.7 billion in hospital savings happened in states like Nevada that opted to expand Medicaid. The 23 Republican states that refused Medicaid expansion are seeing a wave of hospital mergers and closures thanks to the rising cost of uncompensated care.

The next open enrollment period begins on November the 15th, and even though there may be more website glitches, it is bound to go a lot smoother this time around. You may have noticed that the Republicans have stopped talking about repealing Obamacare after more than 50 attempts, and that’s because it’s working. It doesn’t solve the long term cost problem – only healthier lifestyles can do that – but at least fewer Americans will be at needless risk because they can’t afford to see a doctor when they get sick.

And don’t forget that insurance companies can no longer drop you from coverage because you get sick. They can no longer refuse to sell you coverage because of a pre-existing condition. Women can now get free breast cancer screening. The “donut hole” for senior meds is being closed. Children can now stay on their parents’ policies to the age of 26. We’ve also seen the end of lifetime limits to insurance reimbursements.

The rate of uninsured Americans has already dropped from 21% to 16%, which is pretty impressive progress considering the level of Republican obstruction at all levels of government. Had that obstruction not occurred, we would now have more like 20 million newly insured Americans instead of just 10.3 million.

Our friend Mark Amodei supported every single attempt to repeal or delay the implementation of the Affordable Care Act, something voters can’t be reminded of too often. Amodei has been part of the problem from day one, and it’s a little late for him to strike a pose as a bipartisan pragmatist who stays above the fray. It’s time for him to go!

Advertisements