How the Rising Share of Latino Voters Will Impact the 2016 Elections

— by Anna Chu and Charles Posner

A volunteer for President Barack Obama’s re-election campaign, left, registers someone to vote as volunteers register new voters at a table set up in front of campaign headquarters at a local shopping plaza in Phoenix, June 2012.

The United States is undergoing a historic demographic shift, with people of color expected to make up a majority of the population by 2044. Despite the seemingly long trajectory of these changes, the political implications are already being felt. The most significant of these shifts is the sharp increase in the number of Latino voters and their share of the electorate. In the 2012 presidential election, Latino voters—71 percent of whom supported President Barack Obama—helped create a firewall for President Obama in key states. In Colorado, for example, the rising share of Latino voters was enough to win the state for Democrats despite white voters’ support for President Obama dropping by 6 percentage points from 2008.

The rising share of Latino voters in key states may have an even more significant impact on the 2016 presidential election, especially if voter turnout rates are high. To gain a better understanding of the growing Latino influence, the Center for American Progress Action Fund conducted an electoral simulation of the six states with the largest projected share of Latino eligible voters in 2016 and for which 2012 exit polling data are available.

LatinoVote

Read more and explore our findings.

LatinoVote-NV

In Nevada, Latino voters could make up more than a fifth of all voters, spelling trouble for Republicans. If Democrats are able to hold onto 2012 levels of support from voters of color and turnout rates remain the same in 2016 (Simulation 1), the Democratic margin of victory in Nevada could increase nearly 3 percentage points. Even if Republicans are able to regain their higher support levels from voters of color from 2004 as well as their high support levels from white voters from 2012 (Simulation 3), Democrats would still have a three-point margin of victory.

See Also: Key Facts About Nevada Voting Demographics: How Changing Demographics and DAPA-Affected Voters Could Impact the 2016 Elections


This material [the article above] was created by the Center for American Progress Action Fund. It was created for the Progress Report, the daily e-mail publication of the Center for American Progress Action Fund. Click here to subscribe. ‘Like’ CAP Action on Facebook and ‘follow’ us on Twitter

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Clinton at the National Urban League Conference

— July 31, 2015

I’m very pleased that many presidential candidates will be here today to address you. It is a signal that the work you’ve been doing – laboring in the vineyards for decades – is getting the political attention it deserves. But the real test of a candidate’s commitment is not whether we come to speak at your national conference, as important as that is. It’s whether we’re still around after the cameras are gone and the votes are counted. It’s whether our positions live up to our rhetoric.

And too often we see a mismatch between what some candidates say in venues like this, and what they actually do when they’re elected. I don’t think you can credibly say that everyone has a “right to rise” and then say you’re for phasing out Medicare or for repealing Obamacare. People can’t rise if they can’t afford health care. They can’t rise if the minimum wage is too low to live on. They can’t rise if their governor makes it harder for them to get a college education. And you cannot seriously talk about the right to rise and support laws that deny the right to vote.

Three Words: Corporations. Aren’t. People.

by Catherine Cortez Masto, 2016 Candidate for US Senate

CatherineCortezMastoAs attorney general, I made sure everyday Nevadans knew that my door was open for them, that they could count on me to be working for them when they had a problem.

And that’s precisely why Citizens United gets me so riled up: It shuts the door on average Americans and throws it wide open for corporations and billionaires to influence elections. That’s not how our democracy is supposed to work.

We need to stand up now – all of us – and demand an end to Citizens United. It’s the only way to put our elections back where they belong: in the hands of voters. Please, join me now in calling on Congress to end Citizens United.

Click here to add your name: Tell Congress to overturn Citizens United!

The Citizens United decision has been a disaster for our democracy, tearing apart our campaign finance laws and bringing on a flood of anonymous “dark money.” Outside groups spent $500 million in 2014 alone – and 2016 spending is expected to easily pass $1 billion.

We can’t continue to let the voices of everyday Americans be lost in a sea of special interest spending. I’m running for Senate because I’m committed to fighting back against runaway spending that erodes our democracy, but I need you on my side.

Sign the petition today: Tell Congress to overturn Citizens United!

Click here to stand with me and tell Congress it’s time to end Citizens United.

Thank you for standing with me,

YOU May Not Be Allowed to Vote in the Next Election

VoterIDThree bills that threaten OUR rights to vote were introduced this month at the Nevada Legislature.  They are unwarranted legislation in search of a problem that doesn’t exist.  We cannot let them become law!

SB 169, AB 253, and AB 266 require voters to show a limited number of acceptable forms of ID. These types of Voter ID laws impact vulnerable populations who are left struggling to obtain identification that will allow them to exercise their constitutional right to vote.

Introductions of AB 253 and AB 266 were held on Tuesday, March 17, in Assembly Committee on Legislative Operations and Elections at 4 p.m. Contact your Assembly member now and let them know that you oppose any Voter ID bills that will make it difficult for Nevada’s citizens to vote.

There is a false notion that every Nevadan has an ID and if they don’t, they can easily walk over to the DMV and get one. The “Let Nevadans Vote” coalition has been conducting surveys with vulnerable populations such as the elderly and homeless families and through that process, they’ve learned just how difficult it is to obtain an ID. Here are a few of their stories with names removed to protect their privacy:

One Reno woman moved here from another state and lacks a Nevada ID. Her supporting documents were lost to theft and she’s had difficulty just getting a copy of her birth certificate, saying it was “hard as heck” and she has to “jump through hoops.” She’s indigent and reports having both physical and mental disabilities, and relies on public transportation to get around.

A 2014 voter registered as a nonpartisan is currently jobless, homeless, and relies on public transit that he can barely afford. His birth certificate and social security card were stolen, a common occurrence when experiencing homelessness. The only ID he has is a Clarity Card issued by Catholic Charities, which doesn’t meet the requirements of this bill.

Another voter lives in a rural county, 90 miles away from the only DMV office in her county. Everybody in her local community knows her upon sight, but she doesn’t have the requisite ID prescribed by the legislation being proposed to allow her to vote.  She doesn’t drive.  She doesn’t own a car.  She doesn’t have a valid driver’s license (why would she?).  Now add to that, that there is no available public transportation she could utilize to make the hour and a half trip to the DMV to get the ID, nor to make the hour and a half trip back to her home.

Yet another man lives in a rural county in a group facility for those with disabilities. He’s a Vietnam War veteran and Agent Orange snuck up him some time ago.  He’s been voting by mail-in ballot for some time now.  Like the lady in the last example, it’s 90 miles to the nearest DMV facility.  He no longer drives and he also doesn’t have a car or a valid Driver’s license.  There’s no public transportation, and even if there was, just the 3-hour round trip would be exceptionally stressful given his current health conditions.  To be able to vote in future elections, he would not only need to make the trip to the DMV but to the Registrar of Voters office as well to present his ID for the record.

In each of these cases, an undue burden  is placed on each person who should clearly be qualified to vote.  Please contact your Assembly member and make it clear that, as their constituent, you oppose passage of Voter ID bills SB 169, AB 253, and AB266.  You can also use the “Opinions” app at the 2015 NV Legislative Session page to read the bills and comments from others as well as to leave your comments about each bill:  https://www.leg.state.nv.us/App/Opinions/78th2015/A/

ADVOCACY: Voter ID Bills NOW under Consideration

— by Roberta Lange, NVDems Chair

Temp072The first hearing on one of legislative Republicans’ Voter ID bills just started in the Assembly Legislative Operations and Elections Committee.  This bill is the latest attempt by Republicans to make it harder for you to vote.  Across the country, Republicans are engaged in a systematic effort to put as many roadblocks to voting as possible.  The Koch Brothers and their Republican puppets now know that if they are going to win the White House and keep Republicans in power in Congress and the Nevada legislature, they need to ensure as few people vote as possible.

If you care about protecting the right to vote, contact the members of the Assembly Legislative Operations and Elections Committee right now and tell them to oppose AB266:

Republicans in the legislature are determined to make it as hard as possible for minorities, seniors, and military families to vote.  Email them today and tell them you want them focused on improving education and creating jobs, not taking away our right to vote.