#TrumpedUpCare Losers: Those Using Long-Term Care Under Medicaid

Rep. Joe Kennedy III speaking at 4:15AM this morning on the impact of the Republican’s #TrumpedUpCare bill on those who receive Medicaid benefits for #LongTermCare ….so much for Republicans NOT picking “winners and losers” … about 6.9 MILLION seniors across America who could find themselves turfed out of care when there’s no way to pay the bill for their care.

Laxalt Flies Across the Country for Trump Joint Session, Still Won’t Grace Nevada Legislators with His Presence

Attorney General Adam Laxalt (that same guy who potentially wants to be NV’s next governor) was busy today rubbing shoulders at the White House and just couldn’t miss an opportunity to see President Trump in person for his address to a joint session of Congress. Laxalt is attending tonight’s speech as the guest of Trump’s former Nevada campaign chairman, Congressman Mark Amodei. While Laxalt was flying all the way across the country for Trump’s big day, he still can’t be bothered to attend a hearing at the Nevada legislature down the road to answer questions from state lawmakers.

“While Adam Laxalt is off gallivanting in Washington, he still hasn’t shown up for a single committee presentation in Carson City. It’s becoming abundantly clear that Attorney General Laxalt cares more about shaking hands with Donald Trump and talking to die-hard Tea Party activists at CPAC than doing his actual job,” said Nevada State Democratic Party Chair Roberta Lange. “After suing the Obama administration for everything under the sun, it’s no wonder the most partisan Attorney General in Nevada’s history is turning a blind eye to the federal overreach and recklessness coming out of Donald Trump’s White House.”

Paul Ryan/Tom Price/GOP *do* plan to throw grandma off a cliff…after picking her pocket.

Five years ago, a PAC called “The Agenda Project” released a TV ad, warning that GOP House Speaker Paul Ryan had a plan to wipe out the current Medicare system, voucherize it with a plan where seniors would be given a flat dollar voucher amount and thrown to the wolves of a deregulated private insurance market.  Well surprise …

Read the full article here: Paul Ryan/Tom Price/GOP *do* plan to throw grandma off a cliff…after picking her pocket.

On the Horizon … 2018

"I like what I do, so I'll consider it but I like what I do," Sen. Dean Heller said. | Getty
“I like what I do, so I’ll consider it but I like what I do,” Sen. Dean Heller said. | Getty

Dean Heller is the only Republican senator up for re-election in 2018 who serves a state won by both Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton, meaning he’ll be the DSCC’s top target this cycle … if he in fact runs again. But he might instead prefer to run for Nevada’s open governorship, a possibility he now says he will “consider.” That’s a somewhat stronger statement of interest than the last time he spoke publicly about this race back in May, when all he would say is, “I always keep my options open.”

Heller would almost certainly be the GOP’s strongest candidate for governor, but he was fairly hostile to Trump all year, which has almost certainly pissed off a certain segment of Republican primary voters. That could inspire an opponent from the unabashedly racist wing of the party to throw up a roadblock for Heller if he ran for governor, something he likely wouldn’t face if he seeks another term in the Senate.

To Defend Democracy, We Must Demand Financial Transparency from Trump

From executive appointments to policy, understanding Trump’s personal financial interests will be essential to judging his adminstration

— by Jeff Hauser
_whereareyourtaxes

As we hear of a settlement in the “Trump University” civil fraud case brought in part by New York State Attorney General and learn more and more about potential Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin, the phrase “personnel is policy” takes on an unfortunate new meaning.
Will Trump’s appointees to high government office ensure Donald Trump does not use control of the executive branch to enrich himself and his family?

Trump enriching himself as president is not an idle or libelous question. Trump himself raised the prospect in 2000 to Fortune Magazine, telling them that “[i]t’s very possible that I could be the first presidential candidate to run and make money on it.”

Matt Yglesias puts the threat to the rule posed by Donald Trump and the “Trump Organization” in stark language, arguing “Trump’s first 100 days could also be the last 100 days in which America’s system of republican government can be saved.” Yglesias fears that the potential for corruption is so great that “political favor” might become “the primary driver of economic success.”

The Wall Street Journal editorial page employs less ominous language to come to a surprisingly similar conclusion, noting problems posed by the fact that “The President is exempt from federal conflict-of-interest law.”

As Bloomberg put it, the Trump family business poses an “unprecedented potential conflicts of interest.”

The last line of defense against the installation of a kleptocracy is the U.S. Senate, which can insist that President Trump meet the same standards for public disclosure and avoidance of conflict of interest as past presidents and presidential candidates of both political parties.

The U.S. Senate can and should demand transparency into Trump family finances. Moreover, the U.S. Senate can and should demand an end to the inherent conflicts of interest posed by the ongoing existence of “The Trump Organization.”

The Senate can do so by refusing to confirm any nominations until Trump takes the following steps to promote faith that a Trump presidency will not enrich himself and his family:

  1. Releases his tax returns;
  2. Releases a detailed and current financial disclosure that includes beneficial ownership information on all “shell companies”* that are part of the Trump Organization;
  3. Follows the advice of the The Wall Street Journal editorial page that “Mr. Trump’s best option is to liquidate his stake in the company” via “a leveraged buyout or an initial public offering”; and
  4. These disclosure requirements should be treated as annual requirements.

Having President Trump and his children reconstitute a “Trump Organization” to receive payouts from foreign countries and rent-seeking businesses is a serious concern that cannot be prevented merely by an ensuring initial clean post-liquidation start. The Saturday Washington Post includes an article suggesting that diplomats understand the advantages of spending money at Trump’s DC hotel.

There should be particular concern about all non-publicly traded assets he and his children might hold. Trump and his children cannot be allowed to use “shell companies” to hide his actual business partners, creditors, and assets, including dealings with foreign governments or companies with significant potential dealings with the executive branch.

Without these comprehensive actions, Senators have no way to know what conflicts of interest they should be concerned about.

Does the Trump Organization have business dealings with, for example, Japan? If so, that suggests a line of questions for a potential Assistant Secretary of State for East Asian and Pacific Affairs.

Is a Trump company being investigated by the SEC? That matters for potential SEC Commissioners.

Even a Trump infrastructure bill raises questions. Would Trump follow the Dennis Hastert precedent and put forward highway projects designed to increase value of Trump family owned properties?

Trump announces a tax plan – would it benefit him?

Trump Energy Department actions – would they boost Trump family energy investments?

And assets are not the only issue. Senators need to know if any appointments constitute Trump repaying literal debts.

Every part of the federal government can be used to benefit private interests, and thus for all positions, the Senate requires clarity into Trump’s financials.

That goes for Trump-era law enforcement as well. David Dayen has wondered if the Trump win provides “a massive lifeline to Deutsche Bank, the German financial firm that has been rocked recently by rumors that they would have to pay a $14 billion fine to the Justice Department over crisis-related mortgage abuses.”

What’s the basis of Dayen’s curiosity? The fact “that one of Deutsche Bank’s biggest borrowers – Trump – will soon be sitting in the White House.”

Senators need to know how to provide oversight of the executive branch. To have confidence in Trump appointments and governance, Senators must demand both transparency and an end to conflicts of interest. Otherwise, it is all too likely he and his family will make money off control of the executive branch.


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Jeff Hauser runs the Revolving Door Project at the Center for Economic and Policy Research, an effort to increase scrutiny on executive branch appointments and ensure that political appointees are focused on serving the public interest, rather than personal professional