“Trillion Dollar Fraudsters”: We’re Looking At An Enormous, Destructive Republican Con Job, And You Should Be Very, Very Angry

mykeystrokes.com

By now it’s a Republican Party tradition: Every year the party produces a budget that allegedly slashes deficits, but which turns out to contain a trillion-dollar “magic asterisk” — a line that promises huge spending cuts and/or revenue increases, but without explaining where the money is supposed to come from.

But the just-released budgets from the House and Senate majorities break new ground. Each contains not one but two trillion-dollar magic asterisks: one on spending, one on revenue. And that’s actually an understatement. If either budget were to become law, it would leave the federal government several trillion dollars deeper in debt than claimed, and that’s just in the first decade.

You might be tempted to shrug this off, since these budgets will not, in fact, become law. Or you might say that this is what all politicians do. But it isn’t. The modern G.O.P.’s raw fiscal dishonesty…

View original post 665 more words

Advertisements

Affordable Care Act at 3: Increased Savings for Seniors

— by Kathleen Sebelius, Secretary of Health and Human Services,  March 21, 2013

In the three years since the Affordable Care Act became law, the slower growth of health care costs is saving money in Medicare and the private insurance market, helping to curb previously skyrocketing premiums and making Medicare stronger.

The nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office recently estimated that Medicare and Medicaid spending would be 15 percent less — or about $200 billion— in 2020 than was previously projected, thanks to this slower growth. Medicare spending per beneficiary rose by just 0.4% in 2012, while Medicaid spending per beneficiary actually dropped by 1.9% last year. We are making Medicare stronger, too, by spending smarter, promoting coordinated care, and fighting fraud. Not only does this ensure that taxpayer dollars are spent wisely.  It means that those who count on Medicare — our grandparents, parents, our friends, and neighbors – will have it for years to come.

Today, we are announcing that thanks to the Affordable Care Act, more than 6.3 million seniors and people with disabilities on Medicare have saved more than $6.1 billion on prescription drugs since the health care law was enacted three years ago. This is the result of the law’s closing of the prescription coverage gap known as “the donut hole.”

Nearly 3.5 million people with Medicare saved an average of more than $706 each on their prescriptions in 2012.

In the case of Helen Rayon of Pennsylvania, the savings on her medications is enough to help her contribute to the education of her grandson. She says: “I take seven different medications. Getting the donut hole closed … gives me a little more money in my pocket.”

David Lutz, a community pharmacist from Hummelstown, PA, described his elderly customers, “splitting pills, taking doses every other day, missing doses, stretching their medications.”  But he says this has begun to change with the savings resulting from the Affordable Care Act, and that’s good for their health as well as their budgets.

After the law was passed, the Affordable Care Act provided a one-time $250 check for people with Medicare who reached the Part D prescription drug coverage gap in 2010. Since then, individuals in the donut hole have continued to receive savings on prescription drugs. In 2013 individuals in the donut hole are saving over 50% off of the cost of branded drugs. The savings on both brand name and generic drugs will continue to increase until the coverage gap is closed in 2020.

Along with savings on their medications, American seniors have also benefited from access to vital preventive services — such as mammograms, cholesterol checks, cancer screenings, and annual wellness visits — with no Part B coinsurance or deductibles. In 2012, more than 34 million seniors and people with disabilities with Medicare received at least one free preventive service. Having easier access to preventive services without worrying about the cost helps seniors stay healthier and identify health conditions before they become more serious and costly.

Helen works as a health-and-wellness coordinator at a senior center, arranging for health and fitness activities for seniors older than herself.  She knows they struggle with the costs of staying healthy. “If it weren’t for the health care reform, many of our seniors would not get to a doctor,” to get a check up, Helen says. “It is expensive for us to keep good health.”

Affordable Care Act initiatives are also ensuring that if Medicare beneficiaries do end up in the hospital that their care is coordinated and they stay out of the hospital once they’re discharged. This also gives Medicare beneficiaries – and other taxpayers – more value for their health care dollars. In fact, hospital readmissions in Medicare have fallen for the first time on record, resulting in 70,000 fewer readmissions in the last half of 2012.

The Affordable Care Act is helping us keep our moral commitment to ensure that our grandparents and other seniors get the high-quality, affordable health care and security they need and deserve.

To learn more about how the Affordable Care Act is saving seniors on prescription drug costs by closing the donut hole coverage gap, visit www.hhs.gov/news/press/2013pres/03/20130321a.html


NOTE:  Today, in the U.S. House of Representatives, GOP members of that House, on a purely partisan vote, passed the Ryan Budget which, if it were to become law, would repeal the Affordable Care Act, and all of it’s provisions which help not just those folks on Medicare, but those of us who might have what the insurance industry has termed a “pre-existing condition” that they can then use to deny coverage.  It would also allow insurance companies to once again impose both annual and lifetime limits on coverage.  Those of you with children under 26 would no longer be able to continue to carry them on your existing health insurance policy once they reach age 18. And that’s just a few of the provisions that make a difference in ordinary Americans’ lives.  Please take the time to review exactly “what” is covered under Obamacare  and then help us bury Senator Heller in emails, tweets, and letters letting him know you will not forget any vote he takes to repeal this needed and necessary law by voting for Ryan’s Path to Poverty budget.

Affordable Care Act Saves $2.1B for 3.6 million Americans with Medicare

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
February 2, 2012
Contact: CMS Public Affairs
(202) 690-6145


New data show average American with Medicare to save nearly $4,200 through 2021 thanks to health reform

Nearly 3.6 million people with Medicare saved $2.1 billion on their prescription drugs in 2011 thanks to the Affordable Care Act according to data issued today by the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). Savings for people with Medicare will increase over time. According to a new report issued today from HHS, the average person with Medicare will save nearly $4,200 by 2021 because of the new law.

“The Affordable Care Act is already saving money for millions of Americans with Medicare,” said HHS Secretary Kathleen Sebelius.  “As we move forward, we will close the donut hole completely and save even more money for everyone with Medicare.”

The Affordable Care Act provides a 50 percent discount on brand-name prescription drugs and this year, a 14% discount on generics. Last year, it provided a seven percent discount on covered generic medications for people who hit the prescription drug coverage gap known as the donut hole, with 2,814,646 beneficiaries receiving $32.1 million in savings on generics.

In 2011, the 3.6 million Americans who hit the donut hole saved an average of $604 on the cost of their prescription drugs.

Data also show that women especially benefitted from the law’s provision with 2.05 million women saving $1.2 billion on their prescription drugs.

By 2020, the donut hole will be closed completely.  The new report released today by the Department of Health and Human Services finds that this provision and other features of the health reform law will generate substantial savings for people with Medicare. Typical Medicare beneficiaries will save an average of nearly $4,200 from 2011 to 2021. People with high prescription drug costs could save as much as $16,000.

The savings are a product of provisions in the Affordable Care Act and other cost trends that:

  • Decrease prescription drug costs for seniors
  • Make preventive services like mammograms free for everyone in Medicare
  • Reduce growth in Part B premiums (for physician services)
  • Reduce growth in cost-sharing under both Parts A (hospital care) and Part B.

These announcements come one day after HHS announced that in 2012, Medicare Advantage premiums have fallen by seven percent on average and enrollment has risen by about 10 percent since last year.  For more details on that announcement, visit http://www.hhs.gov/news/press/2012pres/02/20120201a.html

For state-by-state savings figures for today’s donut hole announcement, visit: http://www.cms.gov/Plan-Payment/

For a fact sheet about donut hole savings, visit http://www.cms.gov/apps/media/fact_sheets.asp

For the report regarding savings those with Medicare will see over time, visithttp://aspe.hhs.gov/hp/reports/2012/MedicareBeneficiarySavings/ib.shtml

###