The NRCC Stoops to New Fraudulent Lows (Updated)

The National Republican Congressional Committee is tricking would-be Democratic campaign donors into making donations to defeat the candidates they support — with Republican websites that look like they could easily be the campaign pages of Democratic candidates.  Unless site visitors read the fine print on the landing pages and the donation forms, it’s very easy to see how they could think these web sites were those of the Democratic candidates.

As ThinkProgress reported on Monday:

“Ray Bellamy of Florida says he was tricked by the page and accidentally made a donation to the NRCC. “It looked legitimate and had a smiling face of Sink and all the trappings of a legitimate site,” Bellamy told the Tampa Bay Times. The look-alike page uses the same colors as Florida candidate Alex Sink’s campaign, with the URL sinkrocongress2014.com. Once entering information, the person is redirected to an NRCC thank-you page.”

The NRCC launched the mock sites to target Democratic candidates they say are “frauds,” but if this is some sort of lame attempt at satire it’s way off the mark. It’s nothing more than a dirty trick and it’s reprehensible.

The NRCC is making a mockery of democracy and they’re swindling people.  As this year progresses, be extremely careful not to be duped by fraudulent activities committed by members of the Republican party.

NOTE: PFAW (People for the American Way) has started a petition demanding that the NRCC take down their fraudulent campaign sites AND refund any and all donations that have been received via those sites.  You can sign their petition here:

Sign-the-Petition-blu.fw

 

UPDATE:

When you come across a site such as these, take time to READ exactly what the page is saying.  Then, file a phishing complaint with Google and with the U.S. Computer Emergency Readiness Team (US-CERT) if you feel the donation page is deceptively and/or fraudulently soliciting donations.  And please, by all means, scroll to the bottom of the page to see “who” is sponsoring the page.  Here’s what you’ll find at the bottom of the page seeking donations on the NRCC’s “Sink4Congress” page:

SinkforCongress

 

Clue #1 — Alex Sink is a DEMOCRAT, not a REPUBLICAN

Google: http://www.google.com/safebrowsing/report_phish/

Email a complaint to US-CERT at phishing-report@us-cert.gov

These are the URLs known as of now :

http://contribute.AnnKirkpatrick.com
http://contribute.SinemaForCongress.com
http://contribute.RonBarber2014.com
http://contribute.sinkforcongress2014.com/
http://contribute.johntierney2014.com/
http://contribute.martha-robertson.com/
http://renteria4congress.com/

Please feel free to report any or all of them, as well as any others you may come across

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Fraudulent Defense Contractors Paid $1 Trillion

— by Sen. Bernie Sanders 

Hundreds of defense contractors that defrauded the U.S. military received more than $1.1 trillion in Pentagon contracts during the past decade, according to a Department of Defense report prepared for Sen. Bernie Sanders.

Sanders (I-Vt.) called the report “shocking.” He said aggressive steps must be taken to ensure taxpayer dollars aren’t wasted.

“The ugly truth is that virtually all of the major defense contractors in this country for years have been engaged in systemic fraudulent behavior, while receiving hundreds of billions of dollars of taxpayer money,” said Sanders. “With the country running a nearly $15 trillion national debt, my goal is to provide as much transparency as possible about what is happening with taxpayer money.”

The report detailed how the Pentagon paid $573.7 billion during the past 10 years to more than 300 contractors involved in civil fraud cases that resulted in judgments of more than $1 million, $398 billion of which was awarded after settlement or judgment for fraud.  When awards to “parent” companies are counted, the Pentagon paid more than $1.1 trillion during the past 10 years just to the 37 top companies engaged in fraud.

Another $255 million went to 54 contractors convicted of hard-core criminal fraud in the same period. Of that total, $33 million was paid to companies after they were convicted of crimes.

Some of the nation’s biggest defense contractors were involved.

For example, Lockheed Martin in 2008 paid $10.5 million to settle charges that it defrauded the government by submitting false invoices on a multi-billion dollar contract connected to the Titan IV space launch vehicle program.  That didn’t seem to sour the relationship between Lockheed and the Defense Department, which gave Lockheed $30.2 billion in contracts in fiscal year 2009, more than ever before.

In another case, Northrop Grumman paid $62 million in 2005 to settle charges that it “engaged in a fraud scheme by routinely submitting false contract proposals,” and “concealed basic problems in its handling of inventory, scrap and attrition.”  Despite the serious charges of pervasive and repeated fraud, Northrop Grumman received $12.9 billion in contracts the next year, 16 percent more than the year before.

A Sanders provision in a defense spending bill required the report and directed the Department of Defense to recommend ways to punish fraudulent contractors. The Pentagon said sanctions already are in place. “It is not clear, however, that these remedies are sufficient … to deter and punish fraud when it is detected.” That tone was different than what the Pentagon said in a preliminary report last January, which declared that ‘the department believes that existing remedies with respect to contractor wrongdoing are sufficient.”

Said Sanders: “It is clear that DOD’s current approach is not working and we need far more vigorous enforcement to protect taxpayers from massive fraud.”

Under another Sanders provision in a separate law, a government-wide federal contractor fraud database was opened to the public earlier this year.  Access to the Federal Awardee Performance and Integrity Information System had been limited to federal acquisition officials and certain members of Congress.  The DOD promises to ramp up monitoring of this database to ensure its contractors’ fraudulent actions are accurately and fully disclosed.

To read the Pentagon report and the tables, click here and here.

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