How the Health Care Law is Making a Difference for Nevadans

Because of the Affordable Care Act, the 78% of Nevadans who have insurance have more choices and stronger coverage than ever before. And for the 22% of Nevadans who don’t have insurance, or Nevada families and small businesses who buy their coverage but aren’t happy with it, a new day is just around the corner.

Soon, the new online Health Insurance Marketplace will provide families and small businesses who currently don’t have insurance, or are looking for a better deal, a new way to find health coverage that fits their needs and their budgets.

Open enrollment in the Marketplace starts Oct 1, with coverage starting as soon as Jan 1, 2014.  But Nevada families and small business can visit HealthCare.gov right now to find the information they need prepare for open enrollment.

Key Features of the health care law are already providing better options, better value, better health and a stronger Medicare program for the people of Nevada:

Key Features

Coverage

Costs

Care

Better Options

The Health Insurance Marketplace

Beginning Oct 1, the Health Insurance Marketplace will make it easy for Nevadans to compare qualified health plans, get answers to questions, find out if they are eligible for lower costs for private insurance or health programs like Medicaid and the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP), and enroll in health coverage.

By the Numbers: Uninsured Nevadans who are eligible for coverage through the Marketplace. 

  • 473,971 (22%) are uninsured and eligible
  • 347,244 (73%) have a full-time worker in the family
  • 174,840 (37%) are 18-35 years old
  • 218,730 (46%) are White
  • 44,217 (9%) are African American
  • 157,518 (33%) are Latino/Hispanic
  • 33,012 (7%) are Asian American or Pacific Islander
  • 258,036 (54%) are male

438,826 (93%) of Nevada’s uninsured and eligible population may qualify for lower costs on coverage in the Marketplace, including through Medicaid.

Nevada has received $74,754,285 in grants for research, planning, information technology development, and implementation of its Health Insurance Marketplace.

New coverage options for young adults

Under the health care law, if your plan covers children, you can now add or keep your children on your health insurance policy until they turn 26 years old. Thanks to this provision, over 3 million young people who would otherwise have been uninsured have gained coverage nationwide, including 33,000 young adults in Nevada.

Ending discrimination for pre-existing conditions  

As many as 1,157,045 non-elderly Nevadans have some type of pre-existing health condition, including 162,452 children.  Today, insurers can no longer deny coverage to children because of a pre-existing condition, like asthma or diabetes, under the health care law. And beginning in 2014, health insurers will no longer be able to charge more or deny coverage to anyone because of a pre-existing condition.  The health care law also established a temporary health insurance program for individuals who were denied health insurance coverage because of a pre-existing condition.  1,373 Nevadans with pre-existing conditions have gained coverage through the Pre-Existing Condition Insurance Plan since the program began.

Better Value

Providing better value for your premium dollar through the 80/20 Rule

Health insurance companies now have to spend at least 80 cents of your premium dollar on health care or improvements to care, or provide you a refund.  This means that 88,491 Nevada residents with private insurance coverage will benefit from $3,977,544 in refunds from insurance companies this year, for an average refund of $75 per family covered by a policy.

Scrutinizing unreasonable premium increases 

In every State and for the first time under Federal law, insurance companies are required to publicly justify their actions if they want to raise rates by 10 percent or more. Nevada has received $4,959,972 under the new law to help fight unreasonable premium increases.

Removing lifetime limits on health benefits 

The law bans insurance companies from imposing lifetime dollar limits on health benefits – freeing cancer patients and individuals suffering from other chronic diseases from having to worry about going without treatment because of their lifetime limits. Already, 937,000 people in Nevada, including 329,000 women and 269,000 children, are free from worrying about lifetime limits on coverage. The law also restricts the use of annual limits and bans them completely in 2014.

Better Health

Covering preventive services with no deductible or co-pay

The health care law requires many insurance plans to provide coverage without cost sharing to enrollees for a variety of preventive health services, such as colonoscopy screening for colon cancer, Pap smears and mammograms for women, well-child visits, and flu shots for all children and adults.

In 2011 and 2012, 71 million Americans with private health insurance gained preventive service coverage with no cost-sharing, including 615,000 in Nevada. And for policies renewing on or after August 1, 2012, women can now get coverage without cost-sharing of even more preventive services they need.  Approximately 47 million women, including 391,181 in Nevada will now have guaranteed access to additional preventive services without cost-sharing.

Increasing support for community health centers

The health care law increases the funding available to community health centers nationwide. In Nevada, 2 health centers operate 30 sites, providing preventive and primary health care services to 57,987 people.  Health Center grantees in Nevada have received $8,264,743 under the health care law to support ongoing health center operations and to establish new health center sites, expand services, and/or support major capital improvement projects.

Community Health Centers in all 50 states have also received a total of $150 million in federal grants to help enroll uninsured Americans in the Health Insurance Marketplace, including $451,674 awarded to Nevada health centers.   With these funds, Nevada health centers expect to hire 9 additional workers, who will assist 10,600 Nevadans with enrollment into affordable health insurance coverage.

Investing in the primary care workforce

As a result of historic investments through the health care law and the Recovery Act, the numbers of clinicians in the National Health Service Corps are at all-time highs with nearly 10,000 Corps clinicians providing care to more than 10.4 million people who live in rural, urban, and frontier communities.  The National Health Service Corps repays educational loans and provides scholarships to primary care physicians, dentists, nurse practitioners, physician assistants, behavioral health providers, and other primary care providers who practice in areas of the country that have too few health care professionals to serve the people who live there.  As of September 30, 2012, there were 36 Corps clinicians providing primary care services in Nevada, compared to 12 in 2008.

Preventing illness and promoting health

As of March 2012, Nevada had received $7,500,000 in grants from the Prevention and Public Health Fund created by the health care law. This new fund was created to support effective policies in Nevada, its communities, and nationwide so that all Americans can lead longer, more productive lives.

A Stronger Medicare Program

Making prescription drugs affordable for seniors 

In Nevada, people with Medicare saved nearly $41 million on prescription drugs because of the Affordable Care Act.  In 2012 alone, 22,122 individuals in Nevada saved over $14 million, or an average of $611 per beneficiary.  In 2012, people with Medicare in the “donut hole” received a 50 percent discount on covered brand name drugs and 14 percent discount on generic drugs.  And thanks to the health care law, coverage for both brand name and generic drugs will continue to increase over time until the coverage gap is closed.  Nationally, over 6.6 million people with Medicare have saved over $7 billion on drugs since the law’s enactment.

Covering preventive services with no deductible or co-pay

With no deductibles or co-pays, cost is no longer a barrier for seniors and people with disabilities who want to stay healthy by detecting and treating health problems early. In 2012 alone, an estimated 34.1 million people benefited from Medicare’s coverage of preventive services with no cost-sharing.  In Nevada, 166,815 individuals with traditional Medicare used one or more free preventive service in 2012.

Protecting Medicare’s solvency

The health care law extends the life of the Medicare Trust Fund by ten years.  From 2010 to 2012, Medicare spending per beneficiary grew at 1.7 percent annually, substantially more slowly than the per capita rate of growth in the economy.  And the health care law helps stop fraud with tougher screening procedures, stronger penalties, and new technology. Over the last four years, the administration’s fraud enforcement efforts have recovered $14.9 billion from fraudsters.  For every dollar spent on health care-related fraud and abuse activities in the last three years the administration has returned $7.90.

Related articles

Obamacare Moves Forward to Implement Pre-Existing Condition Discrimination Ban

The Obama administration moved forward today to implement provisions in the health care law that would make it illegal for insurance companies to discriminate against people with pre-existing conditions. The provisions of the Affordable Care Act also would make it easier for consumers to compare health plans and employers to promote and encourage employee wellness.

“The Affordable Care Act is building a health insurance market that works for consumers,” said Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius. “Thanks to the health care law, no one will be discriminated against because of a pre-existing condition.”

“The Affordable Care Act recognizes that well-run, equitable workplace wellness programs allow workers to access services that can help them and their families lead healthier lives,” said Secretary of Labor Hilda L. Solis.  “Employers, too, can benefit from reduced costs associated with a healthier workforce.”

The Obama administration issued:

  • A proposed rule that, beginning in 2014, prohibits health insurance companies from discriminating against individuals because of a pre-existing or chronic condition.  Under the rule, insurance companies would be allowed to vary premiums within limits, only based on age, tobacco use, family size, and geography.  Health insurance companies would be prohibited from denying coverage to any American because of a pre-existing condition or from charging higher premiums to certain enrollees because of their current or past health problems, gender, occupation, and small employer size or industry. The rule would ensure that people for whom coverage would otherwise be unaffordable, and young adults, have access to a catastrophic coverage plan in the individual market.  For more information regarding this rule, visit: http://www.healthcare.gov/news/factsheets/2012/11/market-reforms11202012a.html.
  • A proposed rule outlining policies and standards for coverage of essential health benefits, while giving states more flexibility to implement the Affordable Care Act. Essential health benefits are a core set of benefits that would give consumers a consistent way to compare health plans in the individual and small group markets. A companion letter on the flexibility in implementing the essential health benefits in Medicaid was also sent to states.  For more information regarding this rule, visit http://www.healthcare.gov/news/factsheets/2012/11/ehb11202012a.html.
  • A proposed rule implementing and expanding employment-based wellness programs to promote health and help control health care spending, while ensuring that individuals are protected from unfair underwriting practices that could otherwise reduce benefits based on health status.  For more information regarding this rule, visit:http://www.healthcare.gov/news/factsheets/2012/11/wellness11202012a.html

###

What’s Covered in the Affordable Care Act?

— BY KAREN Y.

The Stew steps through the crap the Right-Wing spews about ObamaCare (The Affordable Care Act) and breaks down what this landmark legislation actually means for average Americans.

AFFORDABLE CARE ACT (ACA) OF 2010

  1. Patient Rights and Protections
  2. Insurance Choices and Costs
  3. 65 and Older
  4. Small Business Tax Credits

The Affordable Care Act puts consumers back in charge of their health care. Under the law, a new “Patient’s Bill of Rights” gives the American people the stability and flexibility they need to make informed choices about their health.

Patient’s Bill of Rights

  • Provides Coverage to Americans with Pre-existing Conditions: You may be eligible for health coverage under the Pre-Existing Condition Insurance Plan.
  • Protects Your Choice of Doctors: Choose the primary care doctor you want from your plan’s network.
  • Keeps Young Adults Covered: If you are under 26, you may be eligible to be covered under your parent’s health plan.
  • Ends Lifetime Limits on Coverage: Lifetime limits on most benefits are banned for all new health insurance plans. Before the health care law, many health plans set an annual limit — a dollar limit on their yearly spending for your covered benefits. Many plans also set a lifetime limit — a dollar limit on what they would spend for your covered benefits during the entire time you were enrolled in that plan. You were required to pay the cost of all care exceeding those limits.
  • Restricts Annual Dollar Limits on Coverage: Annual limits on your health benefits will be phased out by 2014.
  • Ends Pre-Existing Condition Exclusions for Children: Health plans can no longer limit or deny benefits to children under 19 due to a pre-existing condition.
  • Ends Arbitrary Withdrawals of Insurance Coverage: Insurers can no longer cancel your coverage just because you made an honest mistake.
  • Reviews Premium Increases: Insurance companies must now publicly justify any unreasonable rate hikes.
  • Helps You Get the Most from Your Premium Dollars: Your premium dollars must be spent primarily on health care – not administrative costs. Starting July 2012, The percentage of your premium dollars that an insurance company spends on providing you with health care and improving the quality of your care (as opposed to what it spends on administrative, overhead, and marketing costs) is known as “medical loss ratio.”

The new law limits how much of your premium dollar your insurer can spend on things other than providing health care and improving its quality. If your insurance company spends less than 80% of your premium on health care, it must provide a rebate of the difference.

  • Removes Insurance Company Barriers to Emergency Services: You can seek emergency care at a hospital outside of your health plan’s network.

Since the Patient’s Bill of Rights was enacted, the Affordable Care Act has provided additional rights and protections.  The health care law:

  • Covers Preventive Care at No Cost to You: You may be eligible for recommended preventive health services. No co-payment.
  • Guarantees Your Right to Appeal: You now have the right to ask that your plan reconsider its denial of payment.

Flexible Spending Account Changes

An arrangement you set up through your employer to pay for many of your out-of-pocket medical expenses with tax-free dollars. These expenses include insurance copayments and deductibles, and qualified prescription drugs, insulin and medical devices. You decide how much of your pre-tax wages you want taken out of your paycheck and put into an FSA. You don’t have to pay taxes on this money. Your employer’s plan sets a limit on the amount you can put into an FSA each year.

  • There is no carry-over of FSA funds. This means that FSA funds you don’t spend by the end of the plan year can’t be used for expenses in the next year. An exception is if your employer’s FSA plan permits you to use unused FSA funds for expenses incurred during a grace period of up to 2.5 months after the end of the FSA plan year.
  • As of January 1, 2011, the costs of over-the-counter medications will be reimbursed under a Flexible Spending Account (FSA), Health Savings Account (HSA), or Health Reimbursement Account (HRA) only if the medications are purchased with a doctor’s prescription. These restrictions do not apply to the purchase of insulin.

Note: Flexible Spending Accounts are sometimes called Flexible Spending Arrangements. Health Reimbursement Accounts are sometimes called Health Reimbursement Arrangements.

Summary of Benefits and Coverage (SBC)

Starting September 23, 2012 or soon after, health insurance issuers and group health plans will be required to provide you with an easy-to-understand summary about a health plan’s benefits and coverage. The new regulation is designed to help you better understand and evaluate your health insurance choices.

Consumer Assistance Programs

  • Many states offer help to consumers with health insurance problems. The Affordable Care Act improves these services with grants that help states start or strengthen Consumer Assistance Programs (CAPs). The states and territories that applied for these grants have received funds provide residents direct help with problems or questions about health coverage.
  • Whether or not your state has a Consumer Assistance Program, you have rights under the health care law, including the right to appeal decisions made by your health insurance provider.
  • If your state does not have a Consumer Assistance Program, some state and federal government offices may still be able to help you determine your rights and solve problems.

Appealing Health Plan Decisions

The Affordable Care Act ensures your right to appeal health insurance plan decisions – to ask that your plan reconsider its decision to deny payment for a service or treatment. New rules that apply to health plans created after March 23, 2010 spell out how your plan must handle your appeal (usually called an “internal appeal”). If your plan still denies payment after considering your appeal, the law permits you to have an independent review organization decide whether to uphold or overturn the plan’s decision. This final check is often referred to as an “external review.”

Covered Preventive Services

Note: Services marked with an asterisk ( * ) must be covered with no cost-sharing in plan years starting on or after August 1, 2012.

Under the Affordable Care Act, you and your family may be eligible for some important preventive services — which can help you avoid illness and improve your health — at no additional cost to you.

  • Screenings for adults: abdominal aortic aneurysm, alcohol misuse screening and counseling, Aspirin use for men and women of certain ages, Blood Pressure screening for all adults, cholesterol screening for adults of certain ages or at higher risk, colorectal cancer screening for adults over 50, depression screening for adults, Type 2 Diabetes screening for adults with high blood pressure, diet counseling for adults at higher risk for chronic disease, HIV screening for all adults at higher risk, immunization vaccines for adults (doses), Obesity screening and counseling for all adults, sexually transmitted infection (STI) prevention counseling for adults at higher risk, tobacco use screening for all adults and cessation interventions for tobacco users, syphilis screening for all adults at higher risk.
  • Covered Preventive Services for Women, Including Pregnant Women: Anemia screening on a routine basis for pregnant women, bacteriuria urinary tract or other infection screening for pregnant women, BRCA counseling about genetic testing for women at higher risk, breast cancer mammography screenings every 1 to 2 years for women over 40, breast cancer chemoprevention counseling for women at higher risk, breastfeeding comprehensive support and counseling from trained providers, as well as access to breastfeeding supplies, for pregnant and nursing women*, cervical cancer screening for sexually active women, chlamydia infection screening for younger women and other women at higher risk, Food and Drug Administration-approved contraceptive methods, sterilization procedures, and patient education and counseling, not including abortifacient drugs*, domestic and interpersonal violence screening and counseling for all women*, folic acid supplements for women who may become pregnant, gestational diabetes screening for women 24 to 28 weeks pregnant and those at high risk of developing gestational diabetes*, gonorrhea screening for all women at higher risk, Hepatitis B screening for pregnant women at their first prenatal visit, Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) screening and counseling for sexually active women*, Human Papillomavirus (HPV) DNA Test: high risk HPV DNA testing every three years for women with normal cytology results who are 30 or older*, osteoporosis screening for women over age 60 depending on risk factors, Rh Incompatibility screening for all pregnant women and follow-up testing for women at higher risk, tobacco use screening and interventions for all women, and expanded counseling for pregnant tobacco users, sexually transmitted infections (STI) counseling for sexually active women*, syphilis screening for all pregnant women or other women at increased risk, well-woman visits to obtain recommended preventive services for women under 65*.
  • Covered Preventive Services for Children: Alcohol and Drug Use assessments for adolescents, autism screening for children at 18 and 24 months, behavioral assessments for children of all ages, blood Pressure screening for children, Cervical Dysplasia screening for sexually active females, Congenital Hypothyroidism screening for newborns, Depression screening for adolescents, developmental screening for children under age 3, and surveillance throughout childhood, dyslipidemia screening for children at higher risk of lipid disorders, Fluoride Chemoprevention supplements for children without fluoride in their water source, gonorrhea preventive medication for the eyes of all newborns, hearing screening for all newborns, Height, Weight and Body Mass Index measurements for children, hematocrit or hemoglobin screening for children, hemoglobinopathies or sickle cell screening for newborns, HIV screening for adolescents at higher risk, immunization vaccines for children from birth to age 18 (doses, recommended ages, and recommended populations vary), iron supplements for children ages 6 to 12 months at risk for anemia, lead screening for children at risk of exposure, medical history for all children throughout development, obesity screening and counseling, oral health risk assessment for young children, Phenylketonuria (PKU) screening for this genetic disorder in newborns, sexually transmitted infection (STI) prevention counseling and screening for adolescents at higher risk, tuberculin testing for children at higher risk of tuberculosis, vision screening for all children.

65 or Older
The Affordable Care Act strengthens Medicare, offers eligible seniors a range of preventive services with no cost-sharing, and provides discounts on drugs when in the coverage gap known as the “donut hole.”

  • Medicare Preventive Services: Under the Affordable Care Act, if you have Original Medicare, you may qualify for a yearly wellness visit and many preventive services for free. Medicare provides preventive benefits to keep you healthy including a yearly wellness visit, tobacco use cessation counseling, and a range of no-cost screenings for cancer, diabetes, and other chronic diseases.
  • Medicare Drug Discounts: The Affordable Care Act includes benefits to make your Medicare prescription drug coverage (Part D) more affordable. It does this by gradually closing the gap in drug coverage known as the “Donut Hole.”
  • Strengthening Medicare: Over $4 billion in Medicare fraud recovered in 2010. Under the Affordable Care Act, the life of the Medicare Trust Fund will be extended to at least 2024 as a result of reducing waste, fraud, and abuse, and slowing cost growth in Medicare. This will provide you with future cost savings on your premiums and co-insurance.

Small Business Employers
Tax credits and new programs are now available to small businesses. Learn how the law helps make care more affordable for employers, employees, and early retirees:

  • Small Employer Tax Credits: Tax credits for small businesses and non-profits help you bring down the cost of providing insurance. If you have fewer than 25 employees and provide health insurance, you may qualify for a tax credit of up to 35% (up to 25% for non-profits) to offset the cost of your insurance. This credit will increase in 2014 to 50% (35% for non-profits). This will make the cost of providing insurance much lower.
  • Early Retiree Reinsurance Program (ERRP): If your company provides health insurance to retirees ages 55 to 64, it may be eligible for financial help through the Early Retiree Reinsurance Program. The Early Retiree Reinsurance Program provides much-needed financial relief for employers so retirees can get quality, affordable insurance.

Compiled by VeracityStew.com

Also by this author:  What’s in Dodd-Frank?

Published with permission.  Originally published on VeracityStew.com [http://veracitystew.com/2012/06/17/whats-covered-in-the-affordable-care-act/]

Ryan’s Budget Would Reinstate Pre-Existing Conditions

Faces of Change: Eliminating Pre-Existing Conditions

At 18-months old Jackson’s insurance company listed him with a pre-existing condition: ear infections. Starting in 2010 insurance company’s were banned from denying children for preexisting conditions.

Rep. Ryan’s “Path to Prosperity” (Poverty) budget would repeal almost every provision of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (what the GOP likes to call  Obamacare).  That means they intend to return full control to their Insurance Company benefactors to once again deny coverage claiming that they’re not obliged to provide coverage based on a pre-existing condition.

I fail to understand what convoluted logic can be used to deny coverage based on a pre-existing condition for a child or for a newborn.  If they covered the mother from the moment of conception to the moment of birth of the child … they essentially covered the child from the moment of conception and therefore there can be no “pre-existing condition.”

PPACA provides coverage for ~50K Americans w/pre-existing conditions

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
February 23, 2012
Contact: CMS Press Office
(202) 690-6145

Pre-Existing Condition Insurance Plan saves lives

Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius today announced that the new health care law’s Pre-Existing Condition Insurance Plan (PCIP) program is providing insurance to nearly 50,000 people with high-risk pre-existing conditions nationwide. The Department released a new report demonstrating how PCIP is helping to fill a void in the insurance market for consumers with pre-existing conditions who are denied insurance coverage and are ineligible for Medicare or Medicaid coverage.

“For too long, Americans with pre-existing conditions were locked out of the health care system and their health suffered,” said HHS Secretary Kathleen Sebelius. “Thanks to health reform, our most vulnerable Americans across the country have the care they need.”

Under the Affordable Care Act, in 2014, insurers will be prohibited from denying coverage to any American with a pre-existing condition. Until then, the PCIP program will continue to provide enrollees with affordable insurance coverage.

PCIP is helping individuals like:

  • Gail O’Brien of Keene, New Hampshire who is now getting help with non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma treatments and is responding very well.
  • James Howard of Katy, Texas who is grateful for the coverage the PCIP program is providing to treat cancer and says that without it, he would not have been able to continue receiving care.

In many cases, PCIP participants have been diagnosed with and need treatment for serious health care conditions such as cancer, ischemic heart disease, degenerative bone diseases and hemophilia.  As a result of the new law, PCIP enrollees are receiving health services for their conditions on the first day their insurance coverage begins.  Their critical need for treatment, combined with their lack of prior health coverage has led to higher overall per-member claims costs in state-based PCIPs of approximately $29,000 per year, which is more than double the per member cost that traditional State High Risk Pools have experienced in recent years.

Enrollment in PCIP has seen a nearly 400 percent increase from November 2010 to November 2011.  PCIP enrollment is anticipated to trend upwards of 50,000 enrollees within the coming month.

People who enroll in the PCIP program are not charged a higher premium because of their medical condition.  Program participants pay comparable premium rates to healthy people in the individual insurance market.  By law, premiums may vary only on the basis of age, geographic area and tobacco use.

PCIP provides comprehensive health coverage, including primary and specialty care, hospital care, prescription drugs, home health and hospice care, skilled nursing care, preventive health and maternity care. The program is available in 50 states and the District of Columbia and open to U.S. citizens and people who reside in the U.S. legally (regardless of income) who have been without insurance coverage for at least six months, and have a pre-existing condition, or have been denied health insurance coverage because of a health condition.

The Affordable Care Act directed the Secretary of HHS to carry out PCIP either directly or through a contract with a state or nonprofit entity.  In 27 states, a state or nonprofit entity elected to administer PCIP, while HHS operates the program in the remaining 23 states and the District of Columbia.

The new report can be found at:  http://www.cciio.cms.gov/resources/files/Files2/02242012/pcip-annual-report.pdf

For more information, including eligibility, plan benefits and rates, as well as information on how to apply, visitwww.pcip.gov and click on “Find Your State.” Then select your state from a map of the United States or from the drop-down menu.

The PCIP call center is open from 8 a.m. to 11 p.m. Eastern Time. Call toll-free 1-866-717-5826 (TTY 1-866-561-1604).