Obamacare Reality Check

— submitted by Rich Dunn, RNDC 2nd Vice Chair

If you’re asked about Obamacare, use it as an opportunity to show how much difference progressive change can make. Open enrollment began one year ago, on October 1st, 2013. The websites had a rocky rollout, but 10.3 million Americans who had no health insurance a year ago now have coverage. Competition has increased – there are now 25% more insurance companies offering policies in the health insurance market. United Healthcare, the market leader, will be offering policies on 25 state exchanges in 2015, double the number in 2014. The system was designed to foster competition, and that is exactly what is starting to happen.

According to the Republicans, the ACA was going to be a government takeover of heathcare. But you wouldn’t know that from how private sector insurers have been doing on the stock market. United Healthcare’s stock is up 16%, Humana’s is up 34%, Aetna’s 22%, Cigna’s 13% and Wellpoint’s a whopping 37%. Some government takeover that turned out to be.

On top of that, 8.2 million seniors have saved over $11.5 billion, money that went right back into the economy. Republicans predicted that Obamacare would send costs through the roof, but between 2010 and 2013 health care costs have only risen at an annual rate of 1.1%, which is the slowest rate of increase of any three year period on record and below the overall rate of inflation.

Hospitals are expected to save $5.7 billion dollars this year alone in uncompensated health care costs. Republicans kept saying that all people without insurance had to do was go to the emergency room, but as usual they never mentioned who was supposed to pick up the tab – the hospital, of course. Thanks to Obamacare, that’s now far less of a problem. Most of that $5.7 billion in hospital savings happened in states like Nevada that opted to expand Medicaid. The 23 Republican states that refused Medicaid expansion are seeing a wave of hospital mergers and closures thanks to the rising cost of uncompensated care.

The next open enrollment period begins on November the 15th, and even though there may be more website glitches, it is bound to go a lot smoother this time around. You may have noticed that the Republicans have stopped talking about repealing Obamacare after more than 50 attempts, and that’s because it’s working. It doesn’t solve the long term cost problem – only healthier lifestyles can do that – but at least fewer Americans will be at needless risk because they can’t afford to see a doctor when they get sick.

And don’t forget that insurance companies can no longer drop you from coverage because you get sick. They can no longer refuse to sell you coverage because of a pre-existing condition. Women can now get free breast cancer screening. The “donut hole” for senior meds is being closed. Children can now stay on their parents’ policies to the age of 26. We’ve also seen the end of lifetime limits to insurance reimbursements.

The rate of uninsured Americans has already dropped from 21% to 16%, which is pretty impressive progress considering the level of Republican obstruction at all levels of government. Had that obstruction not occurred, we would now have more like 20 million newly insured Americans instead of just 10.3 million.

Our friend Mark Amodei supported every single attempt to repeal or delay the implementation of the Affordable Care Act, something voters can’t be reminded of too often. Amodei has been part of the problem from day one, and it’s a little late for him to strike a pose as a bipartisan pragmatist who stays above the fray. It’s time for him to go!

Advertisements

43 GOP Senators Threaten Obstruction Unless Consumer Protection Bureau Is Weakened

— by Pat Garofalo on Feb 1, 2013 at 5:45 pm

When the Dodd-Frank financial reform law first passed, Senate Republicans refused to confirm a director for the newly-created Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. They promised to block any nominee — regardless of that nominee’s qualifications for the job — unless the Bureau was weakened and made subservient to the same bank regulators who failed to prevent the 2008 financial crisis.

President Obama was thus forced to recess appoint Ohio Attorney General Richard Cordray to be the Bureau’s first director. Now that Obama has renewed Cordray’s nomination, the Senate GOP is again promising to block any nominee unless the Bureau is watered down:

In a letter sent to President Obama on Friday, 43 Republican senators committed to refusing approval of any nominee to head the consumer watchdog until the bureau underwent significant reform. Lawmakers signing on to the letter included Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) and Sen. Mike Crapo (R-Idaho), the ranking member of the Senate Banking Committee.

“The CFPB as created by the deeply flawed Dodd-Frank Act is one of the least accountable in Washington,” said McConnell. “Today’s letter reaffirms a commitment by 43 Senators to fix the poorly thought structure of this agency that has unprecedented reach and control over individual consumer decisions — but an unprecedented lack of oversight and accountability.” […]

In particular, Republicans want to see the top of the bureau changed so it is run by a bipartisan, five-member commission, as opposed to a lone director.

They also want to see the bureau’s funding fall under the control of congressional appropriators — it currently is funded via a revenue stream directly from the Federal Reserve.

Republicans want to implement a commission (instead of a lone director) and subject the CFPB to the appropriations process in order to stuff it full of appointees with no interest in regulating and starve it of funds. The other financial system regulators that have to go before Congress for their funds already don’t have the resources to implement Dodd-Frank, thanks the House GOP, leaving large swathes of it unfinished. There are also a host of other reasons that the CFPB needs to be both independently funded and have a strong, independent director.

The CFPB has done important work on behalf of consumers, winning wide praise from consumer advocates and the financial industry. Senate Republicans, meanwhile, have made it abundantly clear that they believe that blocking any and all nominees is an acceptable strategy.


This material [the article above] was created by the Center for American Progress Action Fund. It was created for the Progress Report, the daily e-mail publication of the Center for American Progress Action Fund. Click here to subscribe.


Related Resource:

Feb 2013 GOP Letter to President Obama complete with all 43 signatures